James G. Anderson's Publications

Clapp, C. E., &  Anderson, J. G. ( 2019).  Modeling the effect of potential nitric acid removal during convective injection of water vapor over the Central United States on the chemical composition of the lower stratosphere. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres,  124,  9743-9770. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JD029703

Tropopause‐penetrating convection is a frequent seasonal feature of the Central United States climate. This convection presents the potential for consistent transport of water vapor into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) through the lofting of ice, which then sublimates. Water vapor enhancements associated with convective ice lofting have been observed in both in situ and...

Clapp, C. E., Smith, J. B., Bedka, K. M. & Anderson, J. G. (in press). Identifying Source Regions of Warm Season North American Cross-tropopause Convection and of the Distribution of Convective Outflow. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

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Clapp, C. E. & Anderson, J. G. (in preparation). Modeling the effect of gravity wave temperature perturbations on chlorine activation in the lower stratosphere. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

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Wilkerson, J., R. Dobosy, D. S. Sayres, C. Healy, E. Dumas, B. Baker, and J. G. Anderson (2019), Permafrost nitrous oxide emissions observed on a landscape scale using the airborne eddy-covariance method, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19 (7), 4257-4268, doi:10.5194/acp-19-4257-2019.

The microbial by-product nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance, has conventionally been assumed to have minimal emissions in permafrost regions. This assumption has been questioned by recent in situ studies which have demonstrated that some geologic features in permafrost may, in fact, have elevated emissions comparable to those of tropical soils. However,...

Anderson, J. G. & Clapp, C. E. (2018). Coupling free radical catalysis, climate change, and human health. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 20 (16), 10569–10587. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP08331A.

 

We present the chain of mechanisms linking free radical catalytic loss of stratospheric ozone, specifically over the central United States in summer, to increased climate forcing by CO2 and CH4 from fossil fuel use. This case directly engages detailed knowledge, emerging from in situ aircraft observations over the polar regions in winter, defining the temperature and water vapor dependence of the...

Klobas, J. E., D. M. Wilmouth, D. K. Weisenstein, J. G. Anderson, and R. J. Salawitch (2017), Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions, Geophys. Res. Lett. 44, 7490-7499; doi: 10.1002/2017GL073972.

While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to enhance total column ozone as halogen loading approaches pre-industrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone...

Dobosy, R., D. Sayres, C. Healy, E. Dumas, M. Heuer, J. Kochendorfer, B. Baker, and J. Anderson (2017), Estimating random uncertainty in airborne flux measurements over Alaskan tundra: Update on the Flux Fragment Method, J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., in press; doi: 10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0187.1.

Airborne turbulence measurement gives a spatial distribution of air-surface fluxes that networks of fixed surface sites typically can not capture. Much work has improved the accuracy of such measurements and the estimation of the uncertainty peculiar to streams of turbulence data measured from the air. A particularly significant challenge and opportunity is to distinguish fluxes from different...

Anderson, J. G., D. K. Weisenstein, K. P. Bowman, C. R. Homeyer, J. B. Smith, D. M. Wilmouth, D. S. Sayres, J. E. Klobas, S. S. Leroy, J. A. Dykema, and S. C. Wofsy (2017), Stratospheric ozone over the United States in summer linked to observations of convection and temperature via chlorine and bromine catalysis, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114: E4905-E4913; doi: 10.1073/pnas.1619318114.

We present observations defining (i) the frequency and depth of convective penetration of water into the stratosphere over the United States in summer using the Next-Generation Radar system; (ii) the altitude-dependent distribution of inorganic chlorine established in the same coordinate system as the radar observations; (iii) the high resolution temperature structure in the stratosphere over the...

Sayres, D. S., R. Dobosy, C. Healy, E. Dumas, J. Kochendorfer, J. Munster, J. Wilkerson, B. Baker, and J. G. Anderson (2017), Arctic regional methane fluxes by ecotope as derived using eddy covariance from a low-flying aircraft, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 17(13): 8619-8633; doi: 10.5194/acp-17-8619-2017.

The Arctic terrestrial and sub-sea permafrost region contains approximately 30 % of the global carbon stock, and therefore understanding Arctic methane emissions and how they might change with a changing climate is important for quantifying the global methane budget and understanding its growth in the atmosphere. Here we present measurements from a new in situ flux observation system designed for...

Smith, J. B., D. M. Wilmouth, K. M. Bedka, K. P. Bowman, C. R. Homeyer, J. A. Dykema, M. R. Sargent, C. Clapp, S. S. Leroy, D. S. Sayres, J. M. Dean-Day, T. P. Bui, and J. G. Anderson (2017), A case-study of convectively sourced water vapor observed in the overworld stratosphere over the United States, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 122, doi:10.1002/2017JD026831.

On 27 August 2013, during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys field mission, NASA's ER‐2 research aircraft encountered a region of enhanced water vapor, extending over a depth of approximately 2 km and a minimum areal extent of 20,000 km2 in the stratosphere (375 K to 415 K potential temperature), south of...

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